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HIGHSCORE Sophomore All-Americans Matt and Ryan Bewley skip final two year of high school basketball to begin professional career - HIGHSCORE
MaxPreps Sophomore All-Americans Matt and Ryan Bewley skip final two year of high school basketball to begin professional career
Overtime Elite (OTE) signed its first high school players Friday, inking five-star West Oaks Academy (Orlando, Fla.) forwards Matthew Bewley and Ryan Bewley, per a report by Adrian Wojnarowski of ESPN. The elite Class of 2023 forwards will forgo their high school and college eligibility to join the startup league in September for contracts expected to pay out seven figures for each player over their two year contract.

Matt is regarded as the No. 2 prospect in the Class of 2023 according to 247Sports, while Ryan is ranked No. 16 in the class.
Both players were selected as MaxPreps Sophomore All-Americans last season. Matt Bewley earned first team honors after averaging 17 points, 12 rebounds and three blocks per contest while Ryan Bewley earned honorable mention after averaging 10 points, 10.3 rebounds and two blocks per game.

Overtime Elite, in the process of building a 100,000 square-foot arena and training facility in Atlanta, hired 13-year NBA veteran and national championship-winning coach Kevin Ollie to run the team.

The upstart professional league is offering players a guaranteed minimum of at least $100,000 per year, plus bonuses and shares of equity in Overtime. It also maintains players will participate in revenue from use of their name, image and likeness, including through sales of custom jerseys, trading cards, video games and NFTs.

Overtime has secured $80 million in financial backing from Jeff Bezos, Drake, Alexis Ohanian, Carmelo Anthony, Kevin Durant and others.
Matthew Bewley in action during his freshman year at Northeast.
Photo by Nicholas Koza
Matthew Bewley in action during his freshman year at Northeast.
High school basketball: HIGHSCORE All-American Scoot Henderson set to skip senior year for NBA G League - HIGHSCORE
High school basketball: MaxPreps All-American Scoot Henderson set to skip senior year for NBA G League
Five-star Class of 2022 high school basketball star Scoot Henderson of Kell (Marietta, Ga.) announced Friday on social media he will his senior year and join the NBA G League Ignite team.

Henderson is the first high school player to forgo his senior year to play in the G League. He won't be eligible for the 2022 NBA Draft because of age restrictions, meaning he must spend two years with the Ignite program.
The 6-foot-3 guard is the No. 9 prospect in the Class of 2022 according to 247Sports. He is expected to join Jaden Hardy, Michael Foster Jr. and international prospect Fanbo Zeng on the Ignite team next season.

Henderson was a first team MaxPreps Junior All-American selection this season, averaging 32 points, seven rebounds and six assists per contest to help the Longhorns reach the Georgia AAAAAA state title game. The explosive point guard showed rapid development over the course of his high school career and has the potential to be a lottery pick in the 2023 NBA Draft.

A year ago, Class of 2020 prospects Jalen Green, Jonathan Kuminga, Daishen Nix and Isaiah Todd selected the G League path over the traditional collegiate route.
Scoot Henderson in action during a December game against McEachern.
Photo by Ed Turlington
Scoot Henderson in action during a December game against McEachern.

High school basketball: Social media post suggests Bronny James has been cleared to play...but will he? - HIGHSCORE
High school basketball: Social media post suggests Bronny James has been cleared to play...but will he?
Like father, like son. Bronny James, the national Top 25 sophomore boys basketball recruit and son of LeBron James, is recovered from injury and ready to go just before the playoffs, according to a report.

A Tik Tok post by WhosNextHS indicated the 6-foot-2, 165-pound shooting guard from Sierra Canyon (Chatsworth, Calif.) has been "cleared to start hoopin' " after suffering a torn meniscus in early February.

Sierra Canyon, which had won two straight California Interscholastic Federation Open Division championships before the pandemic ended its 2019-20 season one game short of a possible third consecutive crown, will open the Southern Section playoffs next week.

A text Friday morning to Sierra Canyon coach Andre Chevalier to confirm James' health status or his plans to play for the Trailblazers was not immediately returned.

Sierra Canyon (10-0) is expected to be a top seed in the Open Division, which begins May 28. If it advances, Sierra Canyon would play in the Southern Regional, which takes place June 15-19. For a second straight year, there will be no CIF state basketball championships.

Ranked the No. 25 prospect in the Class of 2023 according to 247Sports, James came off the bench for Sierra Canyon's Southern California championship team last season. He figured to be a starter on the 2020-21 squad, which like the rest of the state had its season delayed until the spring only.
Bronny James has missed Sierra Canyon's shortened 2020-21 spring season due to a knee injury.
File photo by Scott Reed
Bronny James has missed Sierra Canyon's shortened 2020-21 spring season due to a knee injury.
According to the Los Angeles Daily News, James was competing for a Sierra Canyon club team, California Basketball Club, when the injury occurred.

LeBron James returned to the Los Angeles Lakers Wednesday in a 103-100 win over the Golden State Warriors and delivered a triple-double along with making the game-winning 3-pointer. He had missed 25 of the team's final 30 games due to an ankle injury before Wednesday and is waiting for the Lakers' series opener Sunday with the Phoenix Suns.

Sierra Canyon has maintained an unbeaten record despite numerous other setbacks besides Bronny's. At the top of the list is four-star guard Chance Westry, a Pennsylvania native who returned home earlier this month due to personal reasons. The No. 34 overall prospect from the Class of 2022, Westry averaged 14.2 points per outing in five appearances this season.

Max Allen, a 6-foot-8 post player, left the team before the regular season officially got underway April 22 and 7-foot-3 center Harold Yu, who lives in China, also did not join the team.

MaxPreps national basketball editor Jordan Divens contributed to this report.
Texas high school football: Klein Cain's four-star running back Jaydon Blue skipping senior season - HIGHSCORE
Texas high school football: Klein Cain's four-star running back Jaydon Blue skipping senior season
Klein Cain's (Houston) four-star running back Jaydon Blue announced via Twitter on Thursday that he's forgoing his senior high school football season so he can focus on academics and the next level. The 2022 Texas commit was a first-team MaxPreps Junior All-America selection after rushing for 2,155 yards and 30 touchdowns in 11 games last fall.

He helped lead the Hurricanes to an 8-3 record and rushed for at least 200 yards in six games. Blue accounted for over 1,600 yards on the ground and 16 scores as sophomore.

"Football is a brutal sport, and the wear and tear associated with the RB position is undeniable... I plan to take this time to focus on my academics while enhancing my off-field training," Blue stated on Twitter. "This is an incremental step in hopes of one day fulfilling my NFL dream."

Blue showed during his high school career that he has a bright future ahead to potentially be a big-time running at the college and NFL level. He was the top-rated running back on 247Sports for the Class of 2022 and was the No. 31 overall prospect.

He leads a strong 2022 class at Texas and committed to the Longhorns a month after Steve Sarkisian was hired in January.

Other notable commits include Serra (Gardena, Calif.) four-star quarterback Maalik Murphy, Aledo (Texas) four-star safety Bryan Allen Jr., Lewisville (Texas) four-star wide receiver Armani Winfield, Memorial (Port Arthur, Texas) four-star cornerback Jaylon Guilbeau and North Shore (Houston) four-star defensive tackle Kristopher Ross.

Last season, some seniors opted out of playing because of the coronavirus pandemic and the uncertainty of what a season would look like. Additionally, some states moved the season to the spring and a lot of top-recruits enrolled in college early instead of playing their senior year.

It will be interesting to see if Blue starts a new trend in high school football with more top recruits electing to sit out their senior season to get ready for the next level and eliminate the chance of suffering a serious or career-ending injury.
Jaydon Blue, Klein Cain
Photo by Ken Murray
Jaydon Blue, Klein Cain

High school baseball: No-hit king Nolan Ryan among pitchers with at least 500 career strikeouts - HIGHSCORE
High school baseball: No-hit king Nolan Ryan among pitchers with at least 500 career strikeouts
David Clyde of Westchester (Houston) was a high school legend in the early 1970s and his resume includes a multitude of records in the National Federation of High Schools record book, including the mark for career strikeouts with 842. Except that depending on how you determine career strikeouts, Clyde is not Nos. 1 or 2 or even third or fourth.

In fact Clyde comes in behind Mississippi hurler Ronnie Richardson, a pair of Iowa pitchers in Bill Varner and Mike Boddicker, and Oklahoma leader Mark Turner. They are among the pitchers featured in the MaxPreps list of pitchers with over 500 career strikeouts.

To be fair, Clyde does hold the record for a four-year career, which is what the National Federation of High Schools recognizes. However, if a fifth year is included, Richardson moves into the top spot with 856 strikeouts.

Then, if you include pitchers from the schools in Iowa and Oklahoma that play both a summer and fall season (and in some cases a spring and summer season), then you have to include Varner, Turner and Boddicker.

Under these circumstances, Varner set the national record with 1,042 strikeouts in his four years at Decorah, graduating in 1970. He played three spring seasons to go with four summer seasons. Turner had 917 strikeouts in three fall and four spring seasons for Vanoss in Oklahoma from 1989-92.

Boddicker topped Varner for the all-time lead in Iowa, and the nation, with 1,122 strikeouts from 1972-75 while at Norway. Boddicker played three fall seasons to go with four spring seasons. The MLB All-Star also holds the record for most all-time wins with 79 (with all seasons considered). Boddicker went on to earn American League Conference Series MVP honors in 1983 en route to helping the Baltimore Orioles win the World Series.

Clyde also played professionally after being selected by the Texas Rangers with the first overall pick in 1973. Twenty days after pitching his final high school game, Clyde started for the Rangers and won his first MLB outing. Injuries marred his career, however, and he finished with 18 wins and 33 losses.

The first player to record 500 career strikeouts during a spring-only career is believed to be Francis Vidrine, who had exactly 500 while at Seligman (Ariz.) from 1955 to 1958. None other than MLB all-time strikeout leader Nolan Ryan of Alvin (Texas) became the all-time leader in 1965 with 510 strikeouts. Future California Angels teammate Lloyd Allen of Selma (Calif.) topped Ryan with 588 strikeouts upon graduation in 1968. Gene Carfrey of Westfall (Williamsport, Ohio) raised the record to 649 strikeouts in 1969 and then Clyde raised it to 842 in 1973. Richardson has held the spring record ever since 1987.

Another Mississippi pitcher, Randolph Salters of Mooreville, might have broken Clyde's records in the mid-1980s, but his career numbers are unavailable. According to former coach Rex Berryman, in an e-mail to MaxPreps, all of his records and scorebooks were inadvertently destroyed by contractors when Mooreville moved from the old gym to the new gym in 1988.

Salters holds the national record for single season strikeouts, although that total is up for dispute. Three different stories by the Clarion Ledger list Salters with 344 strikeouts, 366 strikeouts and 381 strikeouts during a 25-4 season. The 381 total is the most likely total since the Clarion Ledger ran a story about Salters on May 23, 1985, listing him with 366 and he then pitched in the championship game on May 25, striking out 15.

Salters struck out somewhere in the neighborhood of 140 batters as a junior, but exact totals are unavailable. His sophomore and freshman season are also unknown and he finished his career with a record of 53-9.

With new rules restricting the amount of batters a pitcher can face in a week (Salters once pitched 27 innings in four days in the state tournament), it's unlikely anyone will top the totals amassed by Clyde, Richardson, Varner, Turner and Boddicker. The most recent addition to the list is Bubba Gomez of Fremont Christian (Fremont, Calif.), who had 569 strikeouts between 2016 and 2019. That's still nearly 300 strikeouts away from the spring record.

Sources for the list include the NFHS record book, state association record books, coaches association record books, Iwasatthegame.com, Mississippi Baseball Record Book by John Smillie, and the Cal-Hi Sports Record by Mark and Nelson Tennis.
Bubba Gomez, Fremont Christian
File photo by Jim Malone
Bubba Gomez, Fremont Christian
Pitchers with 500 or more career strikeouts (spring only)

1.   856 — Ronnie Richardson, Lee (Columbus, Miss.), now Columbus (Miss.), 1983-87
2.   842 — David Clyde, Westchester (Houston), now closed, 1970-73
3.   734 — Jerry Boldt, Woodlawn (Chicago), 1979-83
4.   729 — Allen Rath, Highland (Riverside, Iowa), 1983-86
5.   690 — Brad Howard, Oakdale (Tenn.), 1992-96
6.   680 — Kelly Owens, Junction City (Ark.), 1979-82
7.   662 — Jordan Ray, Hillcrest (Tuscaloosa, Ala.), 2005-08
8.   661 — Steve Fink, Kee (Lansing, Iowa), 1970-73
9.   658 — Jaime Sepeda, Sinton (Texas), 1986-89
10. 651 — Tyler Stovall, Hokes Bluff (Ala.), 2005-08

10. 651 — Paul Morse, Danville (Ky.), 1988-92
12. 649 — Gene Carfrey, Westfall (Williamsport, Ohio), 1966-69
13. 646 — Craig Van Hulzen, Apple Valley Christian (Apple Valley, Calif.), 1987-90
14. 644 — David Flattery, St. Edmond (Fort Dodge, Iowa), 1974-77
15. 640 — David Mabe, East Surry (Pilot Mountain, N.C.), 1981-84
16. 637 — Pat Underwood, Kokomo (Ind.), 1971-74
17. 626 — Brian DuBois, Reed-Custer (Braidwood, Ill.), 1982-85
18. 623 — Mike Wisniewski, Bangor (Mich.), 1991-94
19. 612 — Tyler Sander, Okoboji (Milford, Iowa), 2000-03
19. 612 — Jon Peters, Brenham (Texas), 1986-89

21. 606 — Todd Neibel, Waltonville (Ill.), 1980-83
21. 606 — Bert Neff, Mooresville (Ind.), 1990-93
23. 598 — Will Inman, Tunstall (Dry Fork, Va.), 2002-05
23. 598 — Manuel Mendez, Washington Union (Fresno, Calif.), 1990-92
25. 597 — Matt Tomso, Mt. Olive (Ill.), 1987-90
26. 593 — Steve DeRoos, Wheeler (Valparaiso, Ind.), 1984-87
27. 590 — Gunner Baker, Carlisle (Price, Texas), 2010-13
28. 589 — Larry Knight, Lookout Valley (Chattanooga, Tenn.), 1978-80
29. 588 — Lloyd Allen, Selma (Calif.), 1965-68
30. 587 — Schuyler Tripp, Davis County (Bloomfield, Iowa), 2002-05

31. 586 — Mike Mercer, Nishna Valley (Hastings, Iowa), 1980-84
32. 585 — Cody Reed, Ardmore (Ala.), 2011-14
33. 583 — Nate Wernette, Morley Stanwood (Morley, Mich.), 2000-03
34. 580 — Brennen Milby, Green County (Greensburg, Ky.), 2008-13
35. 578 — Ron Robinson, Woodlake (Calif.), 1977-80
36. 575 — Ryno Bethel, Willcox (Ariz.), 1998-2001
37. 572 — David Dinsmore, Reese (Mich.), 2000-03
38. 569 — Bubba Gomez, Fremont Christian (Fremont, Calif.), 2016-19
39. 568 — John Tolson, Decatur Central (Indianapolis), 1998-2001
40. 566 — TJ Prunty, St. Paul Academy (Minn.), 1996-2000

40. 566 — Bob Goodyear, Lutheran (Los Angeles, Calif.), 1971-73
42. 564 — Jake Forrester, Umpqua Valley Christian (Roseburg, Ore.), 2011-14
43. 555 — Todd Malone, Casa Roble (Orangevale, Calif.), 1986-88
44. 553 — Tom Underwood, Kokomo (Ind.), 1969-72
44. 553 — Kevin Waldrum, Millsap (Texas), 1996-97
44. 553 — Steve Streater, Sylva-Webster (N.C.), now Smoky Mountain (Sylva, N.C.) 1974-77
47. 552 — Will Jostock, Lapeer West (Lapeer, Mich.), 2001-04
48. 551 — Ben Van Ryn, East Noble (Kendallville, Ind.), 1987-90
49. 550 — RA Dickey, Montgomery Bell Academy (Nashville, Tenn.), 1990-93
50. 548 — Alec Carney, Webster Christian (Webster, N.Y.), 2002-06

50. 548 — Gregg Johnson, Moorehead (East Monona, Iowa), now West Harrison (Mondamin, Iowa) 1983-85
52. 547 — Richy Harrelson, Iuka (Miss.), now Tishomingo County (Iuka, Miss.), 1988-92
53. 546 — Josh Collmenter, Homer (Mich.), 2001-04
54. 545 — Nick Stiles, Bath (Mich.), 2009-12
55. 542 — Able D'Loera, Grant (Oklahoma City, Okla.), 1998-2001
56. 541 — Del Howell, American Christian Academy (Tuscaloosa, Ala.), 2002-06
56. 541 — Chris Schoon, Anamosa (Iowa), 1974-77
58. 540 — Jerome Hammontree, Sperry (Okla.), 1987-90
59. 535 — Ryan Keaffaber, Northfield (Wabash, Ind.), 2010-13
59. 535 — Thomas Mitchell, Bladenboro (N.C.), 1997-2000

61. 531 — Sam Traver, Potterville (Mich.), 2012-15
61. 531 — Bob Rossi, Corning West (N.Y.), 1969-72
63. 528 — Drew Henson, Brighton (Mich.), 1995-98
64. 526 — Jeff Granger, Orangefield (Texas), 1987-90
65. 525 — Mike Taylor, Iowa Falls (Iowa), 1973-76
65. 525 — Logan Ehlers, Nebraska City (Neb.), 2007-10
67. 524 — Guy Finch, Clarksville (Ind.), 1975-78
68. 523 — Keith Creel, Duncanville (Texas), 1974-77
68. 523 — Kirk Benda, Decorah-North Winneshiek (Decorah, Iowa), 1980-81
70. 521 — Aron Cornett, Concord (Ark.), 2002-04

70. 521 — Ty Henderson, Webber (Bluford, Ill.), 2010-13
70. 521 — Steven Rice, Crawfordsville (Ind.), 2007-10
73. 520 — Brian Bohanon, North Shore (Houston), 1984-87
74. 519 — Drew Tanner, Coffee (Douglas, Ga.), 1979-82
74. 519 — Justin Willoughby, Princeton (N.C.), 1993-96
76. 518 — Ryan Ellison, Isabella (Maplesville, Ala.), 2000-04
76. 518 — Lesley Piersall, Hutsonville (Ill.), 1995-98
76. 518 — Tom King, La Porte (Ind.), 1970-72
79. 517 — Tyler Howe, Northeast (Goose Lake, Iowa), 2000-04
80. 515 — Doug Bates, J.J. Kelly (Va.), 1980-83

81. 513 — Tony Watson, Dallas Center-Grimes (Dallas Center, Iowa), 2000-03
82. 512 — Chandler Shepherd, Lawrence County (Louisa, Ky.), 2006-11
82. 512 — Joe Goodman, Gilbert (Iowa), 2008-11
84. 511 — Scott Davidson, Redondo Union (Redondo Beach, Calif.), 1986-88
85. 510 — Jim Peterson, Sonora (La Habra, Calif.), 1971-73
85. 510 — Brian Barnes, Roanoke Rapids (N.C.), 1982-85
85. 510 — Kevin Mann, Jackson Center (Ohio), 2003-06
85. 510 — Nolan Ryan, Alvin (Texas), 1963-65
89. 506 — Jon Kirby, Estill County (Irvine, Ky.), 1999-2002
90. 505 — Tim Rogers, Bixby (Okla.), 1975-78

91. 502 — Chad Billingsley, Defiance (Ohio), 2000-03
92. 501 — Chase Reeves, Hamilton (Miss.), 2007-11
93. 500 — Francis Vidrine, Seligman (Ariz.), 1955-58
93. 500 — Harvey Marshall, Floyd County (Floyd, Va.), 1975-79

Top 10 Fall-Spring-Summer combo strikeout leaders
1. 1,122 — Mike Boddicker, Norway (Iowa), 1972-75
2. 1,042 — Bill Varner, Decorah (Iowa), 1967-70
3.    917 — Mark Turner, Vanoss (Ada, Okla.), 1989-92
4.    817 — Will Hunt, Asher (Okla.), 1986-89
5.    757 — Mario Enriquez, Davidson (Okla.), 1986-89
6.    743 — Cal Eldred, Urbana (Iowa), 1983-86
7.    735 — Brett Case, Preston (Okla.), 2000-03
8.    732 — Larry Frakes, Goldfield (Iowa), 1968-72
9.    723 — Kevin Lomon, Cameron (Okla.), 1987-90
10.  687 — Cale Elam, Oktaha (Okla.), 2006-10
Note: It's possible Boddicker and Varner would qualify for the "spring only" list, but their spring-only totals are unknown.